Icon for: Kyana Young

KYANA YOUNG

University of Wisconsin at Madison
Years in Grad School: 3

Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

  • Icon for: Mary Albert

    Mary Albert

    Judge
    May 21, 2013 | 03:28 p.m.

    Good work – your video does a good job of communicating to a broad audience. Do you envision commercialization of this technique?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 04:05 p.m.

    Thank you, Professor Albert.

    I do envision commercialization of this technique, but more specifically commercialization of the PECO device. I am currently working with AquaMost Inc. to optimize the device for treatment of a host of contaminants. Thus far, the PECO device has proven to be an effective treatment for waters containing cholera, E.coli, MS2 coliphage, and dyes from industrial wastewater.

  • May 21, 2013 | 08:00 p.m.

    This is a great idea! It also does not seem to be too expensive. Great job with your poster and video. You definitely communicated your research in an effective manner for the lay audience. I was wondering what were the major impediments to successful design and fabrication of your technology? I ask this question because I wonder how easy and expensive it would be to manufacture this system on a large scale?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 09:12 p.m.

    Professor Shin, I am glad you have viewed my poster and video.

    I was not part of the team who designed/fabricated the technology. Rather, my research is based on how well I can optimize the operational parameters of the device to achieve a desired inactivation. The major impediment I experienced was use of the device in Haiti, where electricity is not available/reliable at all times; the company AquaMost Inc. is currently investigating alternatives to the now required electrical outlet component for the device.

    After optimizing the device for maximum inactivation, up-scaling becomes a very feasible option.

  • May 21, 2013 | 11:09 p.m.

    Very nice and clear presentation on a novel solution to an important problem. I really like the fact that it is portable, small scale and point of use which makes it valuable for uses in remote rural areas. Can the antibody distinguish between live and dead cells and how does it do that? Also what are the energy and material costs (UV lamp, TiO2) and are they compatible with deployment in the areas of the world that need them?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 22, 2013 | 11:37 p.m.

    Professor McDonald, thank you for your comments.

    The antibody can not distinguish between live and dead cells. My intact oocysts will not initiate infection unless they are alive (viable). In order for infection to occur, the oocysts opens, releases sporozoites, and begins the life cycle; the antibody stains all life cycle/stages. When I view the life cycle/stages under the microscope, I can distinguish a single oocyst from the viable oocysts in the life cycle (clusters). I should also note that I only see fluorescence when using controls (live and enumerated oocysts sans treatment). Once the PECO treatment has been applied, my samples are completely devoid of any fluorescence.

    I had the opportunity to take a PECO device with me to Haiti. While the device disinfected cholera, concern over available electrical outlets for the device was/is an obstacle in implementation. I relayed this information to the company AquaMost Inc., and we are currently exploring options to use this device with an alternative energy supply (batteries, solar panel, etc.). The cost of the device, without mass production, is $150(USD). Cost to operate the device will rely on the usage cost for a particular region once the device is implemented.

    Not all applications for the device are relegated to the developing world. This device, as a point of use system, can be utilized by the military, regions of the United States that do not rely on a water utility for water distribution, and other regions of the world (natural disaster areas) that may need alternative water treatment options for a short period of time.

  • May 21, 2013 | 11:15 p.m.

    Nicely done! What barriers exist that might prevent you from implementing this technique on a large scale?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 22, 2013 | 11:39 p.m.

    Thank you for commenting, Professor Buneo.

    One barrier that might prevent me from implementing this technique on a large scale is availability of electrical power. A power generator will need to be used once/if the power infrastructure is no longer accessible. Also, another barrier may be access to maintenance supplies once the device has run its course. Since the PECO device is in the preliminary stages, “life” of the device has yet to be determined.

  • Icon for: Peter Pfromm

    Peter Pfromm

    Judge
    May 22, 2013 | 12:20 a.m.

    How would the energy demand per volume of water treated compare to one of the established techniques like microfiltration? You treated in a batch recirculation system, have you designed a conceptual continuous system based on your data that might be realistic for municipal or home water treatment?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 22, 2013 | 11:38 p.m.

    The energy demand for the PECO device is approximately 0.06 kwh/gallon, compared to that of the established technique of microfiltration requiring 0.1kwh/gallon. However, the microfilters are prone to breakage and clogging of the pore strips. This is not a concern for the PECO device, as the device is effective using UV, Chlorine, and OH radicals for the advanced treatment technology.

    Regarding the recirculation system, I have plans to explore a “one time pass” approach using the PECO device. At the time for the submission for this competition, my results showed inactivation by the 3 minute sampling period. After my NSF competition submission, I have achieved complete inactivation of Cryptosporidium by 1 min and 30s; this correlates to a “one time pass” inactivation. Pending further funding, I hope to explore a “one time pass” with the PECO device.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

Presentation Discussion
  • Icon for: Laurel James

    Laurel James

    Trainee
    May 21, 2013 | 12:30 a.m.

    Great research and what a great cause. Good job!

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 09:41 a.m.

    Thank you, Laurel. I am fortunate to be part of this project that ties in population health, global environment, and engineering…the joys of being part of IGERT.

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    Joseph III

    Guest
    May 21, 2013 | 09:17 a.m.

    Interesting study and potential application for reducing numbers of Cryptosporidium in drinking water. Now the task will be to scale up PECO for large volumes of water…or could this be turned into a consumer, countertop device.

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 09:41 a.m.

    Thank you, Joseph. The goal is to scale up PECO for a larger volumes of water. I was provided with limited lab space to conduct my research, so I had to use a smaller PECO device. The results thus far are great; I look forward to future work with a larger device.

  • Small default profile

    Joseph III

    Guest
    May 21, 2013 | 09:52 a.m.

    The water industry is really good at supporting scale up, so you and your colleagues may be able to find a water utility that will cooperate in a scale up test.

  • Small default profile

    Thaís Fonseca

    Guest
    May 21, 2013 | 11:17 a.m.

    What a great job, Kyana!
    Millions of people need your work to be put in place.
    Congratulations for your effort and perseverance!
    And thank you for your contribution!

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 12:14 p.m.

    Thank you, Thaís. I am proud to be part of a project that will help numerous communities of people.

  • May 21, 2013 | 11:34 a.m.

    Hi Kyana. Thank you for a wonderful (and clear!) presentation, and what seems like auspicious research. Could you help me locate your work in a broader context by explaining what the current treatment options are that your work improves from? Best, Kathryn

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 12:43 p.m.

    I am glad you viewed and understood my presentation, Kathryn.

    The current treatment options vary based on location around the world and who provides the water. Water utilities have specific regulations that must be followed regarding pathogens, bacteria, chlorine concentration, etc. The water utility provides excellent water, but large land area for the facility to be housed, along with continual financial backing, is not always an option for everyone in the world.

    If water is not provided by a water utility, then it is the responsibility of the user to treat their own water. From my research, I have read about low maintenance options where people around the world use either clay pots (filtration), solar disinfection (UV), or chlorine tablets (disinfection) to treat their water. My project focuses on the point-of-use device that uses disinfection (chlorine), ultraviolet radiation, and hydroxyl radicals (an oxidant) to treat water.

  • Icon for: Erik Olson

    Erik Olson

    Trainee
    May 21, 2013 | 12:01 p.m.

    Hi Kyanna. Great presentation of very important work. I do hope you have the opportunities for scale-up as Joseph suggests! Best, Erik

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 12:44 p.m.

    Thank you, Erik.

    Scaling-up will be a feasible option once I can optimize the device.

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    Jennifer Perry

    Guest
    May 21, 2013 | 05:53 p.m.

    Excellent presentation would you be available for a live demonstration in the Baltimore/DC area sometime this year?

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 08:59 p.m.

    I am glad you enjoyed my presentation, Jennifer. Please contact me at kryoung@wisc.edu to further discuss a live demonstration.

  • Small default profile

    Lily Qin

    Guest
    May 23, 2013 | 02:28 a.m.

    Nice to see this, Kyana!

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 23, 2013 | 01:16 p.m.

    Thank you, Xiaoli.

  • Icon for: Geoffrey Harlow

    Geoffrey Harlow

    Trainee
    May 23, 2013 | 03:45 a.m.

    3 minutes and the cryptosporidium is inactivated. You explained this very clearly, I learned a lot. Great video.

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 23, 2013 | 01:17 p.m.

    I am glad you learned a lot, Geoffrey.

  • Icon for: Zak Gezon

    Zak Gezon

    Trainee
    May 23, 2013 | 09:09 a.m.

    Fantastic and important research, it is great to see both basic and applied science in action. Keep up the good work!

  • Icon for: Kyana Young

    Kyana Young

    Presenter
    May 23, 2013 | 01:33 p.m.

    Zak,

    Thank you for your comments. I was able to see your “Snow melt, pollination, and Rock n Roll” video. I too think that your research is fantastic and important; thank you for linking the video to your profile.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.