Icon for: Myisha Roberson

MYISHA ROBERSON

Tuskegee University
Years in Grad School: 2

Judges’ Queries and Presenter’s Replies

  • Icon for: Qiaobing Xu

    Qiaobing Xu

    Judge
    May 20, 2013 | 11:25 p.m.

    nice work. do you have direct evidence to show the Ag/ZnO actually forms the hydrid rather than separate individuals in the product? is the antimicrobial property related to the shape of the nanostructures, e.g. spheroids vs. rods?

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 10:31 a.m.

    Thank you. Yes, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (hr-TEM)showed the Ag/ZnO NPs actually form hybrid structures. The micrographs show spherical Ag and rod like ZnO sharing the same lattice planes. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) also showed our hybrids were composed of both nanoscale Ag and ZnO. The shape of the nanostructures does effect antimicrobial properties according to the literature. We witnessed the spherical Ag structures exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the ZnO or hybrid Ag/ZnO NPs, however we did preform an in depth analysis on the effects of the shape of the nanostructure on the antimicrobial activities of the NPs.

  • May 21, 2013 | 04:02 p.m.

    I am trying to understand the data on the right hand side of the poster. If I understand it correctly, Ag>Zn0>Ag/ZnO when it comes to effect on both bacterial and fungal populations. Am I right? The concentrations at which this is effective, is that biocompatible? Is it not high enough to be toxic to living organisms (humans for example) by itself? i.e., is it therapeutically applicable? And could you explain to me how you estimate the population of bacteria (ie., what OD and plate count assays are?

  • May 21, 2013 | 07:36 p.m.

    Are such particles safe for humans?
    Will such hybrid structures be better than just a mixture of silver and ZnO?

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 08:58 p.m.

    A. Baskaran:
    You are correct in understanding that Ag NPs have greater activity than ZnO and Ag/ZnO NPs. The target application for these materials is use in an antimicrobial cream to be applied topically. From the results the concentrations of these NPs must be adjusted to have increased biocompatibility. I do not think these materials will be toxic when used on the human skin.
    Optical density is used a measurement of bacterial and fungal concentration in suspension. We measured the optical density of each microbe before and after treatment using a spectrometer and calculated the microbial concentration using simple equations. Plate count assays allow us to count colonies of the microbes. We performed a serial dilution of each microbe in a nutrient media and pipetted known volumes of the solution on to a petri dish. After incubation the colonies of microbe were quantified. We performed the plate count assays of each microbe alone, and each microbe with a treatment of our experimental materials.

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 09:07 p.m.

    N. Noginova

    We were unable to investigate the toxicity of these materials on human cells during this study. However, we have conducted a literature review and based on the knowledge gained from the literature these NPs should be safe for human use on the skin. The size and shapes of these nanoparticles are similar to those of particles used in commercially available product like sunscreen, which are not toxic to the skin. We discovered simple mixture of silver and ZnO does not behave the same way as the hyrids produced using microwave synthesis.

  • Icon for: Qi-Huo Wei

    Qi-Huo Wei

    Judge
    May 21, 2013 | 09:56 p.m.

    What is the microwave synthesis technique? Can you tell me why you use this method for nanoparticle synthesis?

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 10:22 p.m.

    The microwave synthesis technique involves irradiating pre-cursor materials to produce Ag, ZnO and hybrid Ag/ZnO NPs. Pre-cursors were made into a solution, irradiated for 10 minutes at 300W power under temperature control. The resulting solution was then washed, the particles collected and then dried. The final product was a fine powder. One of the goals of this research was to fabricate nanomaterials using a technique that was both easy and rapid. This goal was achieved using the microwave synthesis technique.

  • May 21, 2013 | 11:17 p.m.

    Interesting work. What is the advantage of Ag/ZnO hybrid over the mixture of Ag and ZnO?

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 22, 2013 | 11:22 a.m.

    H Kong:

    We hypothesized that properties of Ag/ZnO hybrids would work synergistically to function as an antimicrobial agent effective against both bacteria and fungi. Results from the experimentation with a mixture of Ag and ZnO showed insignificant antimicrobial activity.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.

Presentation Discussion
  • Small default profile

    Joseph III

    Guest
    May 21, 2013 | 09:18 a.m.

    Great initiative in using nanoparticles as antimicrobial agents; particularly important for development of anti-yeast drugs as those microorganisms are not responsive to anti-bacterial antibiotics.

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 21, 2013 | 10:32 a.m.

    Thank you Joseph!

  • May 23, 2013 | 08:22 a.m.

    Nice work on the Ag/ZnO combination.
    Can the synthesis procedure scale up for manufacturing?
    ZnO is considered “green” so this could be an improvement on the use of Ag alone.

  • Icon for: Terri La Count

    Terri La Count

    Trainee
    May 23, 2013 | 09:09 a.m.

    Maybe it is too early in your work, but are you planning on testing these nanoparticles on human skin in vivo?

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 23, 2013 | 01:51 p.m.

    Thank you for your interest Terri. Yes, we have planned to test the NPs on human skin cells in vitro and depending on results we will move to in vivo studies.

  • Icon for: Myisha Roberson

    Myisha Roberson

    Presenter
    May 23, 2013 | 01:46 p.m.

    Dr Sri,

    In our lab we can produce about 1-5 grams of the product using the technique and equipment. We have not investigated scaling up this procedure for manufacturing.

  • Further posting is closed as the competition has ended.